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Majority in the next general election in UK

Overall majority in the next general election in UK?

Odd unit: EU | UK | US
Williamhill
2.10
2.88
3.40
81.00

Any party that wins an overall majority in the UK election will get more votes than the total votes won by their competitors. A party must win a total of 329 seats from 650 seats available in order to secure the overall majority. Some UK General elections have resulted to hang parliament especially in 1974 and 2010.

The latest result of election in the UK's 650 constituencies showed that Theresa May's risk has backfired since the conservatives already lost their parliamentary majority. This made them seek the support of Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) in order to form a new government.

In the 2010 general election, there was no single party that won half of the seats in the House of Common. David Cameron led the Conservative party at this time to win most seats with 306 votes. Gordon Brown, leader of the Labour party came second with a total of 258 seats while the Liberal Democrats clinched the third position with a total of 57 seats. The election resulted in a hung parliament and no party could claim above half of the seats in the Commons.

If an election ends up as a hung parliament, it's either two or more political parties cooperate to rule the country or the party with majority seats governs the minority seat party in the Commons. After many days of negotiation in the 2010 election, Nick Clegg, the leader of the Liberal Democrat and David Cameron agreed to combine effort and govern together. After combining forces, the liberal and conservative party had majority of the seats which made them able to form a government.

In 2010, the conservatives combined their 306 seats with the Lib Dems' 57 seats to earn absolute majority. You would assume that a party needs half of 650 seats which is 325 seats in order to claim a majority but a party only needs lesser number to achieve this in reality. Northern Ireland's Sin Fein party did not take up their seats hence the required number of seats has been reduced.

The conservatives were predicted to win 42% of the vote while Labour has also been projected to win 40%. The Lib Dems should win 7%, UKIP 2% and the Greens should also win 2%. In addition to this, the conservatives have been predicted to win 10 seats short of an overall majority while Labour has been predicted to gain about 30 seats. The Lib Dems will gain 5 seats while Scottish National Party (SNP) has been predicted to lose 22 polls.

A single party is required to win more than half of the contested seats in order to form a government since there are 650 seats in the UK.