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Betting on the World Series of Poker (WSOP)

Do you enjoy playing poker? Do you enjoy betting on sports? If you said yes to both questions – you should try betting on the World Series of Poker. You’ll be able to bet on your favorite poker player, and cheer for them to win it all.  You’ll sweat out each hand they play, and you won’t have to make the difficult poker decisions of having to call an all-in on the river against your opponent in a tournament… you will simply just root for the players that you have wagered.

Usually bookmakers offer Odds to win WSOP Main Event prior to the start of the tournament, as well as odds to win once the WSOP Main Event final table of players is announced.  Let’s be realistic here, betting on a poker player to win before the tournament starts is very difficult because there are too many players competing – recently in 2017 there were 8,158,206 players; in 2016 there were 8,058,296 players; in 2015 there were 8,877,625 players, and in 2014 there were a staggering 14,833,732 players!  Not to mention, often time the Main Event winner is a relatively unknown (i.e. although he may be a poker professional, he won’t be offered odds to win by a bookmaker because he is not a famous poker celebrity). Just be aware that although you can wager on your favorite poker players such as Daniel Negreanu, Phil Hellmuth, Johnny Chan, Phil Ivey, Doug Polk, etc. – the chances of picking the winner is almost slim to none.  However, if you do decide to wager on a player, you should bet on poker players that tend to go deep in tournaments, and have an aggressive playing style.  One great site for researching poker players past results is http://pokerdb.thehendonmob.com.

The best chance of picking the right winner is when there are 9 players left, and it is the WSOP Main Event final table.  Here you can see who are the remaining players and their chip stack relative to the average stack.  You can also review the remaining players past tournament results to get a better indicator of their skill level and how often they play live tournaments (i.e. players who play the tournament circuit are usually better than recreational players).  But more importantly, you can see their odds to win and justify whether to place a bet or not.

Let’s review the last five years of the WSOP Main Event Final Table Odds and Results:

Year

Winner

Odds (US)

Final Table Position

Reference

2017

Scott Blumstein

+180

1st

Link

2016

Qui Nguyen

+281

2nd

Link

2015

Joe McKeehen

+125

1st

Link

2014

Martin Jacobson

+800

6th

Link

2013

Ryan Riess

+598

5th

Link

 

Based on recent past results, we can conclude the following:

  • Ideally it is best to pick favorite (i.e. players who are 1st, 2nd or 3rd in chip stack) to win the Main Event tournament because of their advantageous chip lead, and their ability to push opponents around.
  • Avoid long shots (i.e. players who are 7th, 8th or 9th in chip stack) because they are at a disadvantage and are more likely to bust out of the tournament as blinds escalate.
  • Players with impressive tournament resumes (live tournament and online tournament) often do well at the final table because of their skill and experience.
  • Avoid recreational poker players as their luck will eventually run out and they have less experience playing short-handed poker.
  • Players with an aggressive-playing style and a chip-lead advantage shall always do better in this final table structure.

More importantly, you will need your player to run good and get lucky at the right times in order to win the coveted WSOP Main Event bracelet.

If you’re interested in betting in the WSOP, please check out our page for the latest WSOP betting odds.